Carbon 14 radiometric dating is used for we are not officially dating

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What methods do they use and how do these methods work?

In this article, we will examine the methods by which scientists use radioactivity to determine the age of objects, most notably carbon-14 dating.

The most widely known form of radiometric dating is carbon-14 dating.

This is what archaeologists use to determine the age of human-made artifacts. The half-life of carbon-14 is only 5,730 years, so carbon-14 dating is only effective on samples that are less than 50,000 years old.

So by measuring carbon 14 levels in an organism that died long ago, researchers can figure out when it died.

The procedure of radiocarbon dating can be used for remains that are up to 50,000 years old.

Dinosaur bones, on the other hand, are millions of years old -- some fossils are billions of years old.

To determine the ages of these specimens, scientists need an isotope with a very long half-life.

Most carbon atoms have six protons and six neutrons in their nuclei and are called carbon 12. But a tiny percentage of carbon is made of carbon 14, or radiocarbon, which has six protons and eight neutrons and is not stable: half of any sample of it decays into other atoms after 5,700 years.However, the methods must be used with care -- and one should be cautious about investing much confidence in the resulting age...especially in absence of cross-checks by different methods, or if presented without sufficient information to judge the context in which it was obtained.Each of them typically exists in igneous rock, or rock made from cooled magma.Fossils, however, form in sedimentary rock -- sediment quickly covers a dinosaur's body, and the sediment and the bones gradually turn into rock.A form of radiometric dating used to determine the age of organic remains in ancient objects, such as archaeological specimens, on the basis of the half-life of carbon-14 and a comparison between the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-14 in a sample of the remains to the known ratio in living organisms. A technique for measuring the age of organic remains based on the rate of decay of carbon 14.

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